About Us

Roster
Roster

In 1915 Rotary International divided its clubs into separate Districts, improving administration and enhancing opportunities for growth. Originally, the region that was to become District 5230 encompassed a wide area including the cities of Albuquerque, Berkeley, Fresno, Honolulu, Los Angeles, Oakland, Phoenix, Reno, Sacramento, San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose, and Stockton.

In 1957 District 522 was established covering the area from Sanger/Avenal in the south, Carmel/Monterey on the Coast, Fresno in the east, and Lodi in the north.

On April 18, 1980 in Sparks, Nevada, District 522 Governor Donald R. Foppiano appointed a committee to study regrouping the clubs. The committee, comprised of nine PDG’s, including PRIP Cliff Dochterman, Chairman, District Secretary Martin Nelsen, and two AR’s, completed its work in 1982. It recommended regrouping clubs within Districts 522 and 524 to form District 523. Rotary International approved the change on July 1, 1982.

District 523 clubs were all within Fresno, Kings, Monterey, and Tulare counties. In 1991, the District number was changed to 5230. New clubs have continued to be chartered on a regular basis since. Presently, there are 58 clubs within District 5230.

NORTH FRESNO ROTARY

On April 30, 1948, the Rotary Club of Fresno voted to sponsor a new club in north Fresno, and appointed Past President Harry Michell to head a Committee to carry out the project. by May 19, 1948, Dr. Mitchell reported to then District Governor Kelly that 20 leading business and professional men located in the proposed territory and expressed a desire to become charter members of a new Rotary Club.

Fresno Rotary Club voted to relinquish area for the formation of the new club from Belmont Avenue north to the San Joaquin River. (This, a few years later was changed to from Divisadero north, and subsequently territory was relinquished by North Fresno Rotary for the formation of East Fresno Rotary in 1956, and Kerman Rotary in 1957, leaving the present territory for North Fresno Rotary from Divisadero north to the San Joaquin River, and from Blackstone west to Dickinson Avenue.)

Guiding principles

These principles have been developed over the years to provide Rotarians with a strong, common purpose and direction. They serve as a foundation for our relationships with each other and the action we take in the world.

Object of Rotary

The Object of Rotary is to encourage and foster the ideal of service as a basis of worthy enterprise and, in particular, to encourage and foster:

  • FIRST: The development of acquaintance as an opportunity for service;
  • SECOND: High ethical standards in business and professions; the recognition of the worthiness of all useful occupations; and the dignifying of each Rotarian’s occupation as an opportunity to serve society;
  • THIRD: The application of the ideal of service in each Rotarian’s personal, business, and community life;
  • FOURTH: The advancement of international understanding, goodwill, and peace through a world fellowship of business and professional persons united in the ideal of service.

The Four-Way Test

The Four-Way Test is a nonpartisan and nonsectarian ethical guide for Rotarians to use for their personal and professional relationships. The test has been translated into more than 100 languages, and Rotarians recite it at club meetings:
Of the things we think, say or do

  1. Is it the TRUTH?
  2. Is it FAIR to all concerned?
  3. Will it build GOODWILL and BETTER FRIENDSHIPS?
  4. Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned?

Avenues of Service

We channel our commitment to service at home and abroad through five Avenues of Service, which are the foundation of club activity.

  • Club Service focuses on making clubs strong. A thriving club is anchored by strong relationships and an active membership development plan.
  • Vocational Service calls on every Rotarian to work with integrity and contribute their expertise to the problems and needs of society. Learn more in An Introduction to Vocational Service and the Code of Conduct.
  • Community Service encourages every Rotarian to find ways to improve the quality of life for people in their communities and to serve the public interest. Learn more in Communities in Action: A Guide to Effective Projects.
  • International Service exemplifies our global reach in promoting peace and understanding. We support this service avenue by sponsoring or volunteering on international projects, seeking partners abroad, and more.
  • Youth Service recognizes the importance of empowering youth and young professionals through leadership development programs such as Rotaract, Interact, Rotary Youth Leadership Awards, and Rotary Youth Exchange.